I’ve found that it’s way more fun to memorize muscles if you say them like Harry Potter spells.

veterinaryrambles:

isthereadoctorinthehouse:

daphnebeauty:

orbicularis oculi!

OMG, I wish I had thought of that last year. Of course, my lab partner miiiight have thought I was crazy if I started shouting muscle names in a fake British accent.

That works for some of the more obscure disease names as well!  Idiopathic polyradiculoneuritis!

Also works for species names! Phisalixella variabilis!

(via cacajao)

bufonite:

hyacynthus:

ktsaurusr3x:

biologizeable:

I have this problem where the birds at the clinic molt the most perfect and gorgeous feathers I have ever seen and I can’t keep any of them
From top to bottom:
Bald Eagle primary (I think - it was an old one)
Barred Owl secondary
Rock Dove/Pigeon primary
Mallard secondary???
American Kestrel primary
Rock Dove/Pigeon again - tail
Northern Flicker primary - the picture doesn’t do it justice, but the shaft is vibrant yellow

Okay SO we had a guest once ask about the feather thing. (If you don’t know, at least in the USA, possession of a feather of a migratory bird is illegal, and really just don’t take home feathers/eggs/nests/ANYTHING a bird may have had a part in).Anyways, we have feathers as biofacts for people to touch, and a man asks about why we are allowed to have the feathers. My answer was basically “Well, we have the bird, therefore we are allowed to have the feathers. Otherwise, we’d just have a lot of naked birds.”

Bald Eagle feathers are especially off-limits to possess. Under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, all deceased Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles must be sent to the National Eagle Repository in Colorado where the parts are then stored and distributed to various Native American tribes who need them for religious purposes. The exception, as biologizeable mentioned, are places that may legally possess them.

Since when were rock pigeons protected, though? I recall reading that they aren’t a protected species

Non-native and human-introduced species are not protected. This includes Rock Pigeons (Columba livia), European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus), as well as a few other species.

bufonite:

hyacynthus:

ktsaurusr3x:

biologizeable:

I have this problem where the birds at the clinic molt the most perfect and gorgeous feathers I have ever seen and I can’t keep any of them

From top to bottom:

  1. Bald Eagle primary (I think - it was an old one)
  2. Barred Owl secondary
  3. Rock Dove/Pigeon primary
  4. Mallard secondary???
  5. American Kestrel primary
  6. Rock Dove/Pigeon again - tail
  7. Northern Flicker primary - the picture doesn’t do it justice, but the shaft is vibrant yellow

Okay SO we had a guest once ask about the feather thing. (If you don’t know, at least in the USA, possession of a feather of a migratory bird is illegal, and really just don’t take home feathers/eggs/nests/ANYTHING a bird may have had a part in).

Anyways, we have feathers as biofacts for people to touch, and a man asks about why we are allowed to have the feathers. My answer was basically “Well, we have the bird, therefore we are allowed to have the feathers. Otherwise, we’d just have a lot of naked birds.”

Bald Eagle feathers are especially off-limits to possess. Under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, all deceased Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles must be sent to the National Eagle Repository in Colorado where the parts are then stored and distributed to various Native American tribes who need them for religious purposes. The exception, as biologizeable mentioned, are places that may legally possess them.

Since when were rock pigeons protected, though? I recall reading that they aren’t a protected species

Non-native and human-introduced species are not protected. This includes Rock Pigeons (Columba livia), European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus), as well as a few other species.

ktsaurusr3x:

biologizeable:

I have this problem where the birds at the clinic molt the most perfect and gorgeous feathers I have ever seen and I can’t keep any of them
From top to bottom:
Bald Eagle primary (I think - it was an old one)
Barred Owl secondary
Rock Dove/Pigeon primary
Mallard secondary???
American Kestrel primary
Rock Dove/Pigeon again - tail
Northern Flicker primary - the picture doesn’t do it justice, but the shaft is vibrant yellow

Okay SO we had a guest once ask about the feather thing. (If you don’t know, at least in the USA, possession of a feather of a migratory bird is illegal, and really just don’t take home feathers/eggs/nests/ANYTHING a bird may have had a part in).Anyways, we have feathers as biofacts for people to touch, and a man asks about why we are allowed to have the feathers. My answer was basically “Well, we have the bird, therefore we are allowed to have the feathers. Otherwise, we’d just have a lot of naked birds.”

Bald Eagle feathers are especially off-limits to possess. Under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, all deceased Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles must be sent to the National Eagle Repository in Colorado where the parts are then stored and distributed to various Native American tribes who need them for religious purposes. The exception, as biologizeable mentioned, are places that may legally possess them.

ktsaurusr3x:

biologizeable:

I have this problem where the birds at the clinic molt the most perfect and gorgeous feathers I have ever seen and I can’t keep any of them

From top to bottom:

  1. Bald Eagle primary (I think - it was an old one)
  2. Barred Owl secondary
  3. Rock Dove/Pigeon primary
  4. Mallard secondary???
  5. American Kestrel primary
  6. Rock Dove/Pigeon again - tail
  7. Northern Flicker primary - the picture doesn’t do it justice, but the shaft is vibrant yellow

Okay SO we had a guest once ask about the feather thing. (If you don’t know, at least in the USA, possession of a feather of a migratory bird is illegal, and really just don’t take home feathers/eggs/nests/ANYTHING a bird may have had a part in).

Anyways, we have feathers as biofacts for people to touch, and a man asks about why we are allowed to have the feathers. My answer was basically “Well, we have the bird, therefore we are allowed to have the feathers. Otherwise, we’d just have a lot of naked birds.”

Bald Eagle feathers are especially off-limits to possess. Under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, all deceased Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles must be sent to the National Eagle Repository in Colorado where the parts are then stored and distributed to various Native American tribes who need them for religious purposes. The exception, as biologizeable mentioned, are places that may legally possess them.